Net Neutrality: What It Is and Why You Should Care

planit hardware, net neutrality, isp, court of appeals, FCC, federal communications commission, broadband service, network equipment, IT hardware, used Cisco reseller, secondary IT hardwareThe term net neutrality has been popping up a lot over the last few years. It’s seemingly become everyone’s favorite buzzword, sure to light a controversial spark wherever it’s mentioned and rouse the ire of millennials everywhere. With the World Wide Web having just celebrated its 25th birthday, it seems appropriate to start by reviewing what it is that makes the internet so powerful and innovative, even all these years later.

What has always made the Internet fascinating and appealing from the start, I think, is the ability for the end-user to explore and journey. Imagine adventuring through a daunting terrain such as a massive forest or desert; the only thing hindering you being natural law, the physical limitations of this planet and your body. Suddenly, we were introduced to a world where those limitations weren’t really much of a factor, especially as the technology fueling that world continued to advance and mature exponentially. Sure, we were left to experience things differently, with nothing tangible but buttons, keys, screens and the mouse; if we got tired in this realm, it was only from staring at the screen for too long.

The main tenet behind all this is simple: ISP’s (internet service providers—e.g., Comcast, AT&T, etc.) and the government do not get to discriminate amongst websites, content providers, end-users and the like, as to who gets any sort of preferential treatment in the delivery of data; all content is delivered neutrally and with the same preference. The current battle is whether this neutrality should be required by law, so as to protect status quo.

Back in 2006, Jon Stewart made a big show of the net neutrality debate, long before most were aware its now-looming existence. He made jokes that if ISPs could give preferential treatment to pages by sending their data faster to the end-user, then sites like “ihate(nameofISP).com” would take forever to load. As the debate waged on for another four years, the FCC decided to finally take some action to protect the fairness of the internet. In 2010, they enforced the Open Internet Order, which made sure that ISPs couldn’t interrupt the flow of certain kinds of traffic (streaming video or downloading files, for example) simply because it wasn’t in the immediate interest of their business to do so.

As of January of this year, however, that Open Internet Order was nullified and declared unenforceable in the D.C. Circuit Court of Appeals. Now, the race is on between the FCC and the giants of broadband service; both will try and quickly make the case for legislation that favors their side of the fence. If the ISPs get their way, they could, for example, slow down streaming services to push users toward their own digital media service. The FCC is in the middle of tightening up its legal approach to the matter while the public is becoming increasingly vocal about which side they are on.

Our business here at planIT HARDWARE is to provide the best deals on the secondary IT hardware market. The biggest part of what we do is enabling both individual end-users and corporations as a whole to have smoother, faster and safer web experiences. We feel it’s important to protect the integrity of the internet and hope that a resolution is reached soon.

BONUS: Here’s Stephen Colbert breaking down Net Neutrality like a boss.

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Über-Fast Google Fiber Internet Service Considers ATL, Eight Other Metro Areas For Expansion

google fiber, gigabit internet, 1000mbps, planIT hardware, planIT, used Cisco, reseller, network hardware, IT Hardware

It’s about time someone new came around to put Comcast in a headlock.

Google Fiber, the wicked-fast internet and TV service from the web behemoth we all know and love, is in a new stage of expansion. The company is planning on bringing the service to nine new metro areas, including Atlanta.

Up until now, Fiber has only been available, for some reason I can’t begin to explain, in Kansas City, Kansas and Provo, Utah (not the most obvious of candidates); by mid-year, it will be fully deployed in Austin, Texas. The service features gigabit speeds (1000 mpbs), making it 100 times faster than today’s average broadband speeds. To illustrate: I used the Google Fiber “race” widget on their website to compare speeds. I chose the option ‘Download HD Movie’ and set my speed at 10 mbps (the next highest tier was 50 mbps, which is not as close to my average work/home speed of 20mbps). Here were the results:

Google Fiber Speed ComparisonGoogle is now in the stages of purveying these incredible speeds in nine new metro markets. These areas are only potential spots, as the company is simply in the talking/planning stages with these interested parties. The metro areas announced as being in talks are the following: Portland (OR), San Jose, Salt Lake City, Phoenix, San Antonio, Nashville, Charlotte, Raleigh-Durham and Atlanta. Within these metro areas, there are 34 specific municipalities/neighborhoods/cities that are being considered.

Aside from surveying the physical region and determining its appropriateness, Google will also have to ensure that the cities it’s working with hold up their end of the process. Google has given each interested party a ‘checklist.’ This list consists of three main categories of information that a hosting metro would have to deliver to Google: provide information about existing infrastructure; help ensure access to existing infrastructure; help make construction speedy and predictable. If a city chooses not to complete this checklist and does not desire to make the necessary preparations, this would keep Fiber from coming to that area. If you live in any of the above metro areas, keep your fingers crossed!

Oh, yeah…and the price points/packages in the two existing cities are nuts, so expect a good deal:

There’s Gigabit + TV for $120/mo (includes 200+ HD channels and a FREE Nexus 7 tablet), Gigabit Internet for $70/mo, and Free Internet. Yup. Free. If Uncle Herb only needs 5 mbps to take care of business, then he can pay a flat construction fee of $300; this can be done up front or monthly ($25) for a year. On top of this, the Free plan has no service contract (unlike the prior two plans) and is “guaranteed for at least 7 years per address.” So, once you’ve paid off that construction fee, you could have up to 6 years of practically (can’t avoid taxes/fees) free internet.

If your business or home needs better IT infrastructure now, contact us for a quote on any number of network hardware devices. Google Fiber plus the heavy artillery of planIT sounds like a match made in fiber-optic heaven.

Excitedly awaiting the day I call Comcast/Xfinity and blast this over the phone:

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